Some Body to Love
Alexandra Heminsley

Book cover image

Narrated By: Alexandra Heminsley

Duration: 7 hours and 2 minutes

What to expect

Brought to you by Penguin.

'Today I sat on a bench facing the sea, the one where I waited for L to be born, and sobbed my heart out. I don't know if I'll ever recover.'

This note was written on 9 November 2017. As the seagulls squawked overhead and the sun dipped into the sea, Alexandra Heminsley's world was turning inside out.

She'd just been told her then-husband was going to transition. The revelation threatened to shatter their brand new, still fragile, family.

But this vertiginous moment represented only the latest in a series of events that had left Alex feeling more and more dissociated from her own body, turning her into a seemingly unreliable narrator of her own reality.

Some Body to Love is Alex's profoundly open-hearted memoir about losing her husband but gaining a best friend, and together bringing up a baby in a changing world. Its exploration of what it means to have a human body, to feel connected or severed from it, and how we might learn to accept our own, makes it a vital and inspiring contribution to some of the most complex and heated conversations of our times.

© Alexandra Heminsley 2021 (P) Penguin Audio 2021

Genre

Memoirs, Psychology of gender, Autobiography: sport, Gender studies: women & girls, Society & culture: general, Sociology: family & relationships

Listen to a sample

This insightful memoir covers some hefty subjects -- gender identity, body image, infertility, divorce -- with wisdom and grace

Good Housekeeping

Generous, calm and thoughtful . . . Some Body to Love argues cogently for greater openness and understanding towards different gender expressions . . . also page-turningly compelling

Observer

A vital call for compassion and awareness . . . a hugely hopeful and deftly written book - and one that might encourage greater empathy in how we respond to all kinds of difference

i

Staggering . . . This is a world turned upside down . . . Heminsley is unflinching in her exploration of her feelings . . . Her Hollywood ending is her realisation that she doesn't have to blame herself for her situation; rather it is society's fault for creating a world where people like D are scared to express their gender identity

Sunday Times

Heartbreak and happiness sit in tandem in Alexandra Heminsley's wise and generous book . . . . As Alex slowly reconciles herself to the loss of a husband, she recognises that the three of them will still be a family and that, despite the trauma, she is once again happy in her own skin